Activating Youth Voices

Cultivate Youth Arts Magazine Seeking Submissions

activating youth voices in the fight for equality, justice and change

SUBMISSION SEASON: Closes April 15, 2020

  • Poetry
  • Photography
  • Sketch
  • Short Story
  • Mixed-media
  • Spoken Word
  • Sculpture
  • Painting
  • Prose

Open to the Public-at-Large – Writers/Artists must be ages 18 years or younger

In June 2020 look for the inaugural issue of Cultivate, the youth arts magazine to be published each spring, by HopeWorks of Howard County, Maryland. Cultivate is a program of HopeWorks’ Youth Leadership Project, a service-learning program dedicated to empowering teens to challenge systems of oppression and prevent relationship violence in their community.

The Youth Leadership Project creates a space for students to grow in understanding themselves and the world. Facilitating self-care and social justice projects, youth leaders engage in frank discussions, raise their social consciousness and participate in creative projects and activism. Youth Leaders are excited to serve on the magazine’s editorial committee and to participate in the production process.

Themes for your submitted work (both visual and literary) should focus on reflections about growing up, relationships, family and friends, activism, change, social justice, empowerment, transformation, hope, self-care, or healing. The magazine will be available on-line and by mail.

“We protest because we love ourselves, and our people… Love is at the root of our resistance.” – Colin Kaepernick

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 15, 2020

Early submission is encouraged. Acceptance notifications will emailed by June 2020.  Click here to view the Submission Guidelines. Acceptance notifications will be emailed by June 2020. 

Cultivate youth arts magazine is a publication of HopeWorks made possible by the Howard County Arts Council through a grant from Howard County Government.

ABOUT HopeWorks

HopeWorks is Howard County Maryland’s local sexual and intimate partner violence center.  We provide direct support to survivors of sexual violence, intimate partner violence and human trafficking.  We also, work in community to change the culture that allows these forms of violence to continue. 

Sexual and intimate partner violence is based in power differences, not only at an individual level but also structurally in systems of power –known as oppression.  Therefore, our mission, at HopeWorks, at its core, is grounded in anti-oppression work.  

We use a social justice lens; enabling us to address and decrease the root causes of gendered violence (sexual and intimate partner violence) as well as the systems that fuel genocide, racism, transphobia, poverty, xenophobia, ableism, and more.  We support and partner with others doing anti-oppression work, efforts to achieve healthier relationships and a society free from all forms of violence.

HopeWorks envisions a world of interconnected people and communities actively working toward a society where all people are safe and valued and where everyone can reach their full potential.

Questions? Please contact HopeWorks’ Deputy Director, Vanita Leatherwood at (410) 997 -0304.

Catalyst: Inspiration, Contemplation, & Observation

From: Judith Goedeke

This poem was inspired by specific terrorist attacks, and applies equally to the ongoing, everyday, barrage of violence swirling around us.  It was inspired by the magical comfort a mother provided her child.  It was inspired by the work we are all here to do, which requires a steady hand, clear vision and a peaceful heart.  How shall we center ourselves in this turbulent new year? 

The Poem: he shouts from the dark room

. . . his mama scoops him up, rocks him

says “everything is okay, don’t worry

nothing bad can happen where Qu’ran is”

she nods toward a pile of books

a splash of yellow Curious Georges

and the thick, white one

“where Allah is, no harm can come”

she sings to him softly in Farsi

the sounds flow like sunshine

onto olive and orange trees

his eyelids flutter

©Judith Goedeke 2019

Dedicated to the memory of the 51 Muslims murdered in their mosques on March 15, 2019 in Christchurch, New Zealand.

Questions, Prompts & Ideas:

I invite you to wander through the words, paying attention to places that entice or thrill or repel or otherwise jump out.  The shift may show up in your body, mind, emotions or spirit.  Linger there in tender exploration; surround your path with loving kindness.  Poems are my questions and my statements of possibility that I share in hopes you will explore your own.  Feel free to agree or take issue.  Change the words if that suits you.  And please invite yourself fully into the poem by changing any pronouns that don’t fit.

***

Are you a member of a group held in contempt by some folks? Are you a member of multiple groups held in contempt by some folks? Are you at risk simply existing in proximity of hateful people? How does this affect your body? Mind? Emotions? Spirit? Goals? Dreams? Education? Employment? Housing? Health care? Transportation? Food availability? Air and Water quality? Finances? Spirituality? World view? What are the everyday and long term affects of this on your precious life? What cumulative entrenchment, if any, do you experience?

If you are not part of a group held in contempt by some folks, what is the effect on your precious life, of living in an environment where others are vulnerable through no fault of their own? Where do you stumble?  How do you find and maintain a centered way forward?

At times, we are all the child in the poem, crying out for comfort.  Explore your moments of neediness and surround them in tender love.  Search for the bedrock cause; don’t stop until you find it.  What wholesome, truthful solutions arise?

Consider contemplation, meditation, self-care, prayer, the varied and infinite ways to cultivate a wide-open love that is both deeply personal, and is universal.  Consider taking effective actions in hopes of relieving the suffering of others.  Are you called toward inward cultivation or outreach?  Is one more important than the other?  Is it okay to do the thing you are naturally inclined toward, but not the other?  Or do you have a responsibility to do both?

My New Year’s wish is that we hold ourselves steady, rock ourselves, sing to ourselves, plant ourselves even for a moment in a place of peace.  Then may we respect all beings, bring true equality to life, and champion justice for all.

The enormous healing power of words compels Judith to write. She strives to clarify, challenge, redirect, own up to and celebrate life. And do damage control. 

Poetry’s unique spaciousness invites us to land in surprising places, come face to face with ourselves anew, and discover fresh perspectives. It connects us more deeply to ourselves, and erodes isolation. 

“Keep your eyes on the prize, hold on.”   Pete Seeger

About Judith Goedeke:

Judith Goedeke

An award-winning poet and retired acupuncturist, Judith’s work appears in anthologies, literary journals and River of Silver Sky, a book of poems. She facilitates Poem as Portal Workshops that foster loving self-awareness, intentional living and compassion.

Art as Resistance

“Prakriti” by Sangeeta Kaul

Dragonfly Arts Magazine Seeking Submissions

Dragonfly arts magazine

SUBMISSION SEASON: Closes March 31, 2020

  • Poetry
  • Photography
  • Sketch
  • Short Story
  • Mixed-media
  • Spoken Word
  • Sculpture
  • Painting
  • Prose

Open to the Public-at-Large – Writers/Artists do not have to be survivors.

At HopeWorks, we use the arts in three important ways to accomplish our mission: to support survivors in their healing; as a vehicle to increase awareness; and to imagine creative solutions to bring about social change.  

Dragonfly arts magazine, published each spring, is one of our most popular arts-based projects.

Themes for your submitted work (both visual and literary) should focus on reflections about relationships, activism, oppression, love, advocacy, hope, transformative justice, trauma, racial and gender equity, intersectionality, self-care, or healing.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: March 31, 2020

Early submission is encouraged. Acceptance notifications will emailed by June 2020.  Click here to view the Submission Guidelines.

Dragonfly arts magazine is a publication of HopeWorks made possible by the Howard County Arts Council through a grant from the Howard County Government. 

ABOUT HopeWorks

HopeWorks is Howard County Maryland’s local sexual and intimate partner violence center.  We provide direct support to survivors of sexual violence, intimate partner violence and human trafficking.  We also, work in community to change the culture that allows these forms of violence to continue. 

Sexual and intimate partner violence is based in power differences, not only at an individual level but also structurally in systems of power –known as oppression.  Therefore, our mission, at HopeWorks, at its core, is grounded in anti-oppression work.  

We use a social justice lens; enabling us to address and decrease the root causes of gendered violence (sexual and intimate partner violence) as well as the systems that fuel genocide, racism, transphobia, poverty, xenophobia, ableism, and more.  We support and partner with others doing anti-oppression work, efforts to achieve healthier relationships and a society free from all forms of violence.

HopeWorks envisions a world of interconnected people and communities actively working toward a society where all people are safe and valued and where everyone can reach their full potential.

Questions? Please contact HopeWorks’ Deputy Director, Vanita Leatherwood at (410) 997 -0304.

Join the Chrysalis Journal Editorial Collective!

The Transformative Language Arts Network is looking for members to join the Chrysalis Journal Editorial Collective.Hello friends,

I’m excited to share with you that TLAN’s Chrysalis Journal will be revived in 2020!

We currently have 3 TLA members committed to the editorial collective and are looking for 2-3 more to join as manuscript readers. This role entails reviewing manuscript submissions and selecting which ones to publish. Each collective member will also choose 2-3 manuscripts to personally shepard through the editorial process making sure that the manuscript meets the style guidelines for the journal.

Might you be interested in joining the editorial collective? We have an excellent team coming together so far to make our next issue the best yet!

If you’d like to learn more about Chrysalis you can read about it on the website TLANetwork.net where you can also find past issues to review. Please feel free to reach out to me as well. I’m happy to talk with you and answer any questions!

To the power of words,

Liz Burke-Cravens, EdD
TLA Network Council Chair

Storytelling and the Human Connection for Equality and Community with Lyn Ford

In December of 2017, Mandy Markoff and Michelle Montgomery were called to action by an incident of racism and the responses denouncing racism in their community: Upper Arlington, Ohio resident and middle-school teacher Darrion House, walking his two dogs on a Sunday morning, was told by a passing jogger, “I don’t trust black people with those dogs.” When asked “What?”, the jogger replied, “I don’t trust you with those dogs,” and continued jogging.
This incident didn’t make news in the year of the Charlottesville horrors, but it caused a ripple effect in its community. Many Upper Arlington residents and organizations banded together to nurture a change in mindsets, develop safe and open dialogues on topics important to respecting diversity and creating true empathy, and inform young students through adults on what “community” should be. Upper Arlington is predominantly high-income and 94% white, but it does not accept the stereotype of “privileged.” Its schools, library system and some government officials supported Markoff and Montgomery’s efforts, and the unity-for-equality hopes promoted and proclaimed through the initial sales of signs, shirts and stickers drawing attention to a cause.
The EQUAL forum page was created on Facebook, and now boasts more than 1400 members, including U.S. Rep. Steve Stivers. Members meet monthly under the mission statement “Promote a positive environment for our community.”
The group has helped coordinate multicultural programs in some schools. It works to raise awareness of issues besides racism, such as treatment of those with disabilities and the outcomes of inequities of socioeconomic status.
TLAN member and council member Lyn Ford feels honored to present “The Power of Human Connection,” a program of storytelling and discussion, on Saturday, October 26, at the Upper Arlington Public Library in partnership with Equal UA. In this program, Lyn will share authentic stories about her experience as an Affrilachian American and how the power of story bridges differences and strengthen connections. Lyn explains how stories as well as sharing personal experiences with racism,  can help repair and sustain communities:
There is a folktale about two critters who are intolerant of one another’s differences. Miz Rabbit and Mr. Monkey  end up telling stories to one another, and become kinder neighbors. The last line of the story states that when we’ve truly listened to one another’s stories, we are no longer enemies. We can become friends. That may seem simplistic, but there is truth in the tale, and hope. That’s why I share my personal experiences with racism, intolerance and abuse, as well as my family’s folktales. I offer truths to which others can relate, as a building block for communication and community.
For more on her program, see the library description, and learn more about the Equal forum here.

Welcome to Hanne Weedon, Our New Managing Director

The Transformative Language Arts Network announces the hiring of Hanne Weedon as our new Managing Director. Hanne comes to TLAN with over 20 years of leadership and program development experience in not-for-profit and government-funded organizations. A longtime community, arts and social justice advocate, she resonates with the goals and values of the TLA Network, as she explains:

We are at such an interesting and challenging moment, with all that is happening in our families, our communities, and on our planet. There is much important work to be done to shift the trajectory, and there are exciting opportunities to have real and significant impact on what comes next. Artists have always played crucial roles in times of social transformation, and I feel truly honored and  lucky to have been invited to play a leadership role around supporting, empowering and engaging with storytellers dedicated to using their art to further social justice issues!

Hanne is committed to working collaboratively with TLAN members to expand the organization’s reach. Her previous experience bears this out: She co-founded Women Creating CommUNITY Landsdowne, a start-up community-based arts program, headed up a government-funded arts-and-economic development initiative in her town, helped build a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting working families, and has worked with a variety of large and small nonprofits as a fund raiser. In an earlier iteration, she also worked as a labor organizer, ran a small side business making wedding dresses, and made a living as a bike messenger.

As a community member and deeply engaged parent, Hanne built a flourishing neighborhood association of 1000+ neighbors, created a diverse and vibrant parent-led play group and preschool in her town, and has led peer counseling workshops, trainings and classes for young people and adults alike. A first-generation American, Hanne’s ties to family and friends overseas run deep, and her appreciation for, understanding of and dedication to building representative, inclusive and diverse communities is a core aspect in all her work. To say her name (it’s Norwegian): Hah-nah. 

“Hanne brings us deep experience in board development, non-profit management, marketing, fundraising, and administration to reach many new communities at a time when finding, amplifying, and witnessing our individual and collective stories is crucial,” says Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg, one of the founders of the TLA Network.

Hanne is now available for your TLA Network questions at director@TLANetwork.org.

Narratives of Self & Society: Writing Life Stories for Change with Dr. Liz Burke-Cravens

Last month, the Transformative Language Arts Network launched their second self-paced class offering, Narratives of Self & Society: Writing Life Stories for Change created by Liz Burke-Cravens. Here in this interview, Liz shares what inspired her to create this class, the transformative potential of writing life stories, and what you can expect from the course.   

What inspired you to teach this class?

My own experiences with autobiographical writing have been inspiring my own writing and my teaching for quite some time. When I was in the eighth grade, my English teacher – whom I absolutely adored – required students to write an autobiography. As I put the narrative together, writing the words in my vulnerable young voice, I felt something inside of me shift. Although I did not have the language to describe what had changed, I simply knew that I saw myself differently than I had before. There was something about the act of putting my feelings and thoughts into words, writing them down on paper, and telling the story of my own life experiences that has fascinated me ever since.As an undergraduate at UMass Amherst, I wrote my first autoethnography – although I did not call it that at the time; I called it a political autobiography. This autoethnography was a collection of poems I titled, “My Body Speaks” in which I gave voice to the stories and emotions living within my body as an act of reclamation and empowerment.

Writing that poetic autoethnography forever changed how I perceived myself and how I walked through the world.

How is writing life stories – drawing from practices of autoethnography specifically – a transformative experience? What makes the this medium different from other forms of expression?

These experiences inspired my doctoral research which explored autoethnography as a personally and socially transformative mode of inquiry and expression of life stories. I was also particularly interested in learning about the unique value of autoethnography as a platform for underrepresented voices.

The findings of my study corroborated my own transformative experience writing autoethnography. My findings also expanded my understanding of it as well. Through writing an autoethnography, participants in my study experienced:

  • Personal growth, which reflected their experiences of personal development that included increased self-awareness, self-acceptance, confidence building, different worldview, and educational process;
  • An emotional process, which reflected their experiences of a variety of emotional realities and processes including painful or difficult emotions, joyful or fun emotions, feelings of liberation, therapeutic or healing experiences, and feelings of vulnerability;
  • Social connectedness, which reflected their responses related to experiences of the self in relation to others that included social responsibility, increased sense of belonging or connection, and
  • Transpersonal experiences which reflected their descriptions of qualities beyond their control and contributed to his or her sense of wholeness and spiritual growth.

Overall, autoethnography facilitated personal growth, greater self-awareness, greater awareness of contexts and systems in which one participates, and provided a meaningful creative experience.

Who/What are some of your favorite life-story writers?

This is always a tough question. The first writers that come to mind are Joan Nestle whose work A Restricted Country was a life changer for me as a young activist. Carolyn Kay Steedman’s Landscape for a Good Woman: The Story of Two Lives was also pivotal for me, and anything and everything written by Dorothy Allison – Two or Three Things I Know for Sure and Bastard Out of Carolina, in particular, have been my favorites.

As far as poets who write about their lives, I think of Marie Howe, Toi Derricotte, Sharon Olds, Ada Limon, and Claudia Rankine come to mind.  

What should students in this class expect?

Although this is a self-paced class, my intention was to be your guide, helping you navigate the content and the writing students will do. They will have the opportunity to do quite a bit of self-reflective writing, investigating the stories of their life experiences from a variety of different vantage points, exploring memories, learning from others on their journey, and describing places that are or have been meaningful to them.

I will also guide you through a 10-step process for creating powerful and evocative life stories for the purpose of personal and social transformation. They will learn about what that means in general as well as what it means for them in particular. They will also have the option to engage in a number of creative prompts intended to help generate more writing and to keep their creative self inspired.

Each unit consists of a brief podcast lecture by me, a few articles and book chapters for you to read, related video and audio content, writing project development instructions, and creative prompts.

Is there anything else about this class you would like to share?

One really important point I want to share is that there is no one “right” way to do autoethnography. In fact, we encounter this type of life-story writing all the time; we just don’t call it autoethnography. But drawing on certain aspects of more formal autoethnographic processes and considerations can greatly enrich our life stories, making them powerful narratives for change.

My hope is that folks will approach this course, the resources, lectures, and writing and creative prompts with a sense of curiosity and playfulness. Have fun with this and enjoy!

For more information and to sign up for class, visit https://www.tlanetwork.org/event-3173329 .

About Dr. Liz Burke-Cravens

Dr. Liz Burke-Cravens is a poet, interdisciplinary educator, and writing coach. She is the founder of A Brave Space, a learning community that seeks to create positive social change and personal transformation through writing. Her work has appeared in Ireland and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and History: A Multidisciplinary Encyclopedia, Volume 2, The Irish Herald, Soulstice: A Feminist Anthology Volume II, and Sandy River Review. Liz enjoys traveling, cycling, photography, and all things foodie. She has a deep love for language and a passion for teaching. Originally from Portland, Maine, she now lives in Oakland, California with her wife, Amber, and their two dogs, Schmoopie and Mr. Bits. You can learn more about her work, courses, and inspirations at http://www.abravespace.org.

Six Ways to Find the Work You Love — Read All About It!

Some of our first cohort group in the Right Livelihood Professional Training

Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg just published a piece on Medium all about how we can listen to our callings and find our life’s work. You can read it here, and you can learn more about the Right Livelihood Professional Training they’re leading through the TLA Network here. 

Also, please join Caryn with Laura Packer, who together are leading the TLA Right Livelihood Professional Training, for a Life and Livelihood Small Group training on March 23. It’s only $9.99, and you can ask your own burning question about what’s calling to you. Information here.

STARTING SOON The Five Senses and The Four Elements: Connecting With the Body and Nature Through Poetry–with Angie Ebba

We move our bodies through this world, experiencing it daily, but often not connecting with either the world or our selves in a conscious and intentional way. This six-week class will help us to slow down, breathe deeply, and experience our bodies in this world. Through a variety of readings and texts, online discussions, and creative writing exercises, participants will investigate what it means to be in their bodies in the natural world. 

Participants will be invited to engage in the natural world in whatever means possible for them – be that on a park bench in a busy city, through an apartment window in the suburbs, camping in a forest, walking through open fields, or working in a garden – and to embrace their bodies in their current state of being. Creative writing will focus on the senses of the body, the elements of nature, and the ways we can be more aware of those things in our daily life. We will explore these themes through various forms of poetry including traditional nature-based forms such as the bantu, haiku, and renga, as well as forms such as the pantoum, free verse, and communal writing.

Class begins on September 5th!

Register here

Read an interview with Angie here and find out more about the class!

About the Teacher

Angie Ebba is a queer disabled femme. As a writer, educator, activist, and performance artist, she believes strongly in the transformative powers of words and performance. She has taught writing workshops, presented, and done performances across the United States, including at the Body Love Conference. Angie is a poet published in Hematopoiesis Press, the Queering Sexual Violence anthology, several literary magazines, and her self-published blog and zines. She teaches writing workshops at Portland Community College, through the TLA Network, and also occasionally through her own website. Angie fully believes in the power of words to help us gain a better understanding of ourselves, to build connections and community, and to make personal and social change. Angie is currently working on writing and producing a one-woman multi-genre performance about the body and the soul. You can find Angie online at rebelonpage.com

The New Issue of Chrysalis is Here!

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.58.45 AM

On behalf of myself and the rest of the editorial collective, Roy Ringel, Iris Madelyn, Barb Burt, and Paula Grunthaner, we are so excited to share the latest issue of Chrysalis Journal of Transformative Language Arts with you!

Huge thanks to all of the TLA facilitators, practitioners and artists who submitted their amazing work to the journal!

Read Vol. 2, Issue 1 here